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At the heart of English folk

Archive

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English Dance & Song, Winter 2015

English Dance & Song, Winter 2015

The cover feature is an article on Moore Moss Rutter, a trio of musicians in their early twenties who have been performing together since their teenage years. The article considers their individual paths to traditional music as well as their current projects and their approach to music within the trio.

English Dance & Song, Autumn 2015

The cover feature in the Singer, Song and Source series is The Dovetail Trio, three young musicians – Rosie Hood, Matt Quinn and Jamie Roberts – singing the song ‘The Two Magicians’. The source is Mr Sparkes, a blacksmith from Minehead who was visited by Cecil Sharp in 1904.

English Dance & Song, Summer 2015

English Dance & Song, Summer 2015

June 2015 sees the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo. The battle was the subject of several broadsides and traditional songs and one of them is featured in the regular Singer, Song and Source series. The song ‘The Eighteenth Day of June’ first appeared as a broadside, and was recorded from oral tradition; it is now sung by The Wilsons from Teesside – five brothers who have been singing together for many decades and have recently been accompanying pop singer Sting. The extended ‘Source’ feature, by Peter Wood, examines a variety of songs about the battle.

English Dance & Song, Spring 2015

English Dance & Song, Spring 2015

The cover feature is Alistair Anderson, a consummate musician whose playing of the English concertina and Northumbrian pipes has delighted audiences for several decades.  Alongside some of his musical biography, Alistair has some important things to say about the role and importance of traditional music.

English Dance & Song, Winter 2014

English Dance & Song, Winter 2014

The featured singer in the Singer, Song and Source series is Bryony Griffith from Yorkshire, who has recently released her first solo album, Nightshade (having previously recorded with husband Will Hampson and with the Demon Barbers).  The song is Wild, Wild Berry – a unique song recorded from Ray Driscoll who lived in London and Shropshire, which is where he learned the song. Allan Wilkinson writes on Bryony, while Gwilym Davies contributes on Ray Driscoll.