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Creative Folk Dance for Primary Schools
Creative Folk Dance for Primary Schools by Barry Goodman Some simple dances for Primary schools, suitable for introducing figures and formations with dance descriptions and musical notation. The following dances are included in the pack:...
     
Morris Contemporary Dance
Morris Contemporary Dance This resource aims to introduce a creative, contemporary approach to using morris within the secondary dance curriculum. It is for teachers and students teaching and learning dance at key stages 3, 4 and 5 (11 plus years...
     
Two Folk Dance Tune Sets
Two Folk Dance Tune Sets A set of jigs and a set of reels chosen and arranged by Rob Harbron as part of The Full English school project at Hanham High School, South Gloucestershire in 2014. Each set consists of 3 dance tunes chosen to work well...
   
Thanks
An enormous thank you to all the photographers and dancers who participated in the compilation of the presentation. Thanks for very helpful feedback to: Liza Austin Strange, Toby Bennett, Barry Goodman, Sue Coe, Laura Connolly, Jeff Dent, Alex...
Social Dance (5)
As with performance dance, social dancing is a thriving and evolving tradition; new dances are constantly being devised. The old dances have moved around the country and indeed, to other countries and back and have developed along with the music,...
Social Dance (4)
The dances can be in several different formations such as, circles, squares and longways sets ( a column of pairs). There will always be a caller who first teaches the moves, and figures, and then calls the figures throughout the dance. These have...
Social Dance (3)
A slightly more formal occasion may have a predominance of the older period dances, such as those from the Playford collection and other dancing masters, the dance might be called a Playford dance or Ball. These dances originated from collections...
Social Dance (2)
The terms used can be interchangeable and have much crossover. The nature of the occasion in which the dances take place tends to determine whether it’s called a ceilidh, country or barn dance. For example, ceilidh, country, and barn dance may be...
Social Dance
English social dancing is dancing in groups, most often with a partner and one or more other couples with a caller to guide and lead the dances. The dances are made up of a sequence of figures , which may be more or less complex. Many people have...
Maypole
Dancing at May time is an old custom, common in many cultures, to welcome in the summer, and probably began by dancing around a significant tree or bush in the village. In Europe, from mediaeval times, the maypole was a tall tree trunk bedecked...
Southern English Step Dance (2)
S t ep Each dancer has their own style, without set routines, and will have a favourite type of tune, for example hornpipes, that they best like to dance to. Dartmoor step dancing South Zeal, Devon, date unknown Photo: Doc Rowe
Southern English Step dance
There are continuing traditions and thriving enclaves of hard-soled shoe stepping in East Anglia and Devon, including within the Romany/Gypsy and Traveller community. More recently, stepping is enjoying a resurgence across Cornwall, Hampshire,...
Northern English clog (2)
The north of England is the home of step dancing in wooden-soled clogs. Dances and steps are most notably found in Durham, Northumberland, Lakeland (Cumbria), and Lancashire. As well as being danced in social settings, there are also some...
Northern English clog
The north of England is the home of step dancing in wooden-soled clogs. Dances and steps are most notably found in Durham, Northumberland, Lakeland (Cumbria), and Lancashire. As well as being danced in social settings, there are also some...
Clog and Step
Clog and step are percussive forms of dance, generally performed by small groups and solo dancers. At one time most of the country would have had some kind of step dance tradition, often danced in the street, in pubs, and during social occasions....
Broom (2)
Morris dancer Sam Bennett, of Ilmington, was famed for his own broom dance. A 1926 film of him performing it, complete with sound, was made in the year before the release of Hollywood’s first ‘talkie.’ Sam’s broom dance is still performed in...
Broom
Traditional broom dances are found throughout England from as far afield as East Anglia and Devon. Broom dances can include stepping along, around, or over a broom, as well as difficult tricks or figures such as balancing the broom on the hand or...
Hobby Horses (2)
Many morris sides now have a hobby horse or similar ‘animal’ – from dragons to unicorns to sheep – as one of the characters in the side. Many are based on the hooden horses of East Kent, which have long snapping jaws made of wood. In the morris,...
Hobby Horses
Hobby Horses have been recorded as part of carnivals, processions, folk plays, folk dances, calendar customs and rituals since Medieval times, throughout Europe. Thousands watch them whirl and cavort through the streets of Padstow, Minehead and...
Other Dance traditions (2)
Another unique dance is the Abbots Bromley Horn Dance from Staffordshire. This features the Horn Dancers comprising six Deer-men, a Fool, Hobby Horse, Bowman and Maid Marian. A carbon analysis discovered that the antlers used in the dance date...

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